What They Don’t Know

Three secrets. One decision. A friendship that will change everything.

Mellie has always been the reliable friend, the good student, the doting daughter. But when an unspeakable act leads her to withdraw from everyone she loves, she is faced with a life-altering choice―a choice she must face alone.

Lise stands up―and speaks out―for what she believes in. And when she notices Mellie acting strangely, she gets caught up in trying to save her…all while trying to protect her own secret. One that might be the key to helping Mellie.

Told through Mellie and Lise’s journal entries, this powerful, emotional novel chronicles Mellie’s struggle to decide what is right for her and the unbreakable bond formed by the two girls on their journey.

 

This book is written in the form of journal entries by 2 characters.  It delves into the controversial topic of abortion and the varying emotions that a woman can experience while weighing the moral aspects of abortion.  The author does an excellent job of showing the internal struggle of making the decision to have an abortion. This is a very timely book with great insight into the matter.  It also deals with family relationships and friendships showing how family relationships can go awry and that friendships can last even if the parties are not close.

Want a Good Book for the Break – Check out These New Reads

 

Suggested Reading by Dave Connis

 

With the Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo

 

The Testaments by Margaret AtwoodImage result for maple leaf

 

 

 

 

Stepsister by Jennifer Donnelly

 

Tick Tock Terror by Melanie JacksonImage result for maple leaf

 

Death by Airship by Arthur SladeImage result for maple leaf

 

 

 

 

The Quiet You Carry by Nikki Barthelmess

 

Michigan vs. the Boys by Carrie S. Allen

Moon of the Crusted Snow

With winter looming, a small northern Anishinaabe community loses communication. Days later, it goes dark. Cut off from the urban realm of the south, many of its people become passive and confused. They eventually descend into panic as the food supply dwindles, with few hunters left in the First Nation. While the band council and a pocket of community members struggle to maintain order, an unexpected visitor arrives from a city in the south to escape a crumbling society. Soon after, others follow. The community leadership is faced with the dilemma of allowing the urban refugees to live with them on their territory. Tensions rise, and as the months pass, so does the death toll due to sickness and despair. Frustrated by the building chaos, a group of young friends and their families turn to the land and tradition in hopes of helping their community thrive again, while they grapple with a grave decision.

 

I did not know what this book was about when I started but it quickly became apparent.  How do people deal when the modern conveniences they have become accustomed to are suddenly removed from their lives?  This book chronicles how a town of indigenous people react which shows how bad things can get, which will definitely come as a shock to some.  I didn’t particularly like this book, it seemed that the events were too contrived, jumping to the worst case very quickly.

February Prize Draws

The first round of prize draws was held at a pizza lunch on Wednesday, February 5, 2020.  There were many prizes to be won with each participant receiving coupons for Taco Time and buy one get one 50% off Booster Juice as well as a few draws for a free Big Mac.  Draws were also made for some bigger prizes with Sierra Gold winning a $10 Burger King gift card and a Tigers team signed hockey stick, Meray Mayer won a $25 Mall gift card and Ashtyn Gold won a $25 Boston Pizza gift card, a Cineplex 2 for 1 and the Grand Prize of a Kindle e-reader.   The next prize draw will be held at the beginning of June so there is still time to read the books and get entered.

 

People Kill People

People kill people. Guns just make it easier.

A gun is sold in the classifieds after killing a spouse, bought by a teenager for needed protection. But which was it? Each has the incentive to pick up a gun, to fire it. Was it Rand or Cami, married teenagers with a young son? Was it Silas or Ashlyn, members of a white supremacist youth organization? Daniel, who fears retaliation because of his race, who possessively clings to Grace, the love of his life? Or Noelle, who lost everything after a devastating accident, and has sunk quietly into depression?

One tense week brings all six people into close contact in a town wrought with political and personal tensions. Someone will fire. And someone will die. But who?

 

Ellen Hopkins did not disappoint once again.  This is a great book detailing the emotions people can go through which push them toward violence, how easily they can snap but also how they can change after a bad event.  It also shows how easily innocent people can be killed by the wide spread easy access to guns in the USA.

The Hazel Wood

Seventeen-year-old Alice and her mother have spent most of Alice’s life on the road, always a step ahead of the uncanny bad luck biting at their heels. But when Alice’s grandmother, the reclusive author of a cult-classic book of pitch-dark fairy tales, dies alone on her estate, the Hazel Wood, Alice learns how bad her luck can really get: her mother is stolen away―by a figure who claims to come from the Hinterland, the cruel supernatural world where her grandmother’s stories are set. Alice’s only lead is the message her mother left behind: “Stay away from the Hazel Wood.”

This book is a fantasy and I do not particularly like fantasies so I really did not enjoy it at all.  I guess if you are into this type of story it was probably very good. There were many different facets to it with numerous fairy tales interwoven that all come together in the end.  I found following the main character to be quite the task and not an enjoyable one.

In time for the Christmas break

Orphaned by Eliot Schrefer

 

The Crimes of Grindelwald by J. K. Rowling

 

What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli & Adam Silvera

 

 

 

A Dog’s Way Home by W. Bruce Cameron

 

My Side of the Mountain by Jean Craighead George

 

Hunted by Meagan Spooner

 

 

 

 

Firegirl by Tony Abbott

 

Pretend She’s Here by Luanne Rice

 

The (Not So) True Story of the Ralston School Herman by Mary-Lee BlemingsImage result for maple leaf

 

 

 

Grenade by Alan Gratz

And then there was FURNITURE

It has been a long process but the Library now has furniture.  A couple of bistro tables for working and a soft seat area for relaxing and conversing.  An art project is in the making and I will provide a picture of it when it has been completed.  A big thank you goes out to Kayden, Kolton and Tanner for all their help in assembling the furniture.  If you haven’t already stopped by to see the new furnishings then make a point to do so.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz

In April 1942, Lale Sokolov, a Slovakian Jew, is forcibly transported to the concentration camps at Auschwitz-Birkenau. When his captors discover that he speaks several languages, he is put to work as a Tätowierer (the German word for tattooist), tasked with permanently marking his fellow prisoners.

Imprisoned for more than two and a half years, Lale witnesses horrific atrocities and barbarism—but also incredible acts of bravery and compassion. Risking his own life, he uses his privileged position to exchange jewels and money from murdered Jews for food to keep his fellow prisoners alive.

A vivid, harrowing, and ultimately hopeful re-creation of Lale Sokolov’s experiences as the man who tattooed the arms of thousands of prisoners with what would become one of the most potent symbols of the Holocaust, The Tattooist of Auschwitz is also a testament to the endurance of love and humanity under the darkest possible conditions. 

 

I quite enjoy historical books.  It is always interesting to see things from the point of view of people who lived during the time.  This book does not disappoint. It sets out the hardships endured, the cruelty encountered but it also shows how the prisoners were able to keep a flicker of hope alive.  A first hand accounting of the life (good and bad) of a prisoner tasked with tattooing new prisoners. I highly recommend this book to everyone.